Taking the rough out of smoothies
 

Dental News
Article detail

See the following article detail about

Taking the rough out of smoothies

0845 527 9810

Article details for

Taking the rough out of smoothies

 

Taking the rough out of smoothies

With summer just around the corner, many of us will be resolving to adopt a healthier lifestyle and what better way is there to increase our intake of fruit and vegetables than reaching for a fresh fruit smoothie.

No longer confined to health food stores, fresh juice and smoothie bars are opening in most towns and shopping centres.

They are now so much more accessible, that as a nation we drank 34 million litres of smoothies last year – enough to fill almost 14 Olympic-size pools!

The health benefits of eating at least five portions of fruit and vegetables daily are undisputed.

Research shows increased fresh fruit and vegetable intake lowers the risk of diabetes, heart disease cancer and osteoporosis to name just a few.

Many see smoothies as an entire healthy meal in a glass, the ultimate fast food and a great way to increase fruit and vegetable intake, particularly in children.

Recently however, concern has been expressed over the high sugar content and acidic nature of some fruit juices and smoothie combinations.

The UK's leading independent dental health charity has warned that the high sugar and acid content of some smoothies could lead to an increase in acid erosion and tooth decay.

While recognising the benefits of fruit and vegetables in the diet, Dr Nigel Carter of the British Dental Health Foundation commented that ‘fruit smoothies are becoming increasingly popular and the fruit content can make them seem like a good idea. However, they contain very high levels of sugar and acid and can do a lot of damage to the teeth.'

The fruit acids found particularly in citrus fruits are strong enough to dissolve the enamel on the tooth surface, whilst fruit sugars can also cause tooth decay. The British Nutrition Foundation has also expressed concern over the sugar content of some commercially available smoothies, which ranges from 20g to 35g per 250mls, more than a can of cola.

By following these simple guidelines we can reap the health benefits of smoothies and fruit juices without putting our teeth at risk.

Homemade is best
Home made juices and smoothies are preferable to commercially produced products as we can control the sugar and fruit acid content. Many commercial smoothies are made from concentrated juices. Fruit juice made from concentrate has been reconstituted with water and has much lower levels of vitamins. Those sold at ambient or room temperature may contain fewer additives or sweeteners but the pasteurising process that allows it to be stored at room temperature destroys many of the nutrients. The addition of sugar and water to concentrated fruit juice often reduces the nutritional value even further.

Limit to one a day
Some manufacturers claim that their products provide two of the five recommended daily fruit portions, whilst guidelines issued by both the Department of Health and World Health Organization state that fruit juices and smoothies should count as only one. One portion would be equal to a 250mls serving.

Drink in one sitting
Your 250mls serving is best consumed in one sitting, rather than being sipped over a prolonged period of time. This decreases the frequency of contact to the tooth surface by the fruit acids and sugar in the smoothie or fruit juice. For young children the size of the serving should be considerably less. Most 250ml servings contain the juice of 3-4 portions of fruit, much more than a child would normally consume in one sitting. Juices and smoothies should not be given in bottles or drinking cups for drinking over a prolonged period and are best drunk through a straw.

Vary choices of fruit with vegetables
Using vegetable juices is also beneficial, as the antioxidant, vitamin and mineral content of  vegetables is also substantial, without the sugar and acidic content of fruit. Reduce the use of fruits with high sugar or acid content. Check out the table below which shows the acid content (pH value) of many popular fruit and vegetables. The lower the pH value the higher the acid content.

Use avocado as a base
Many smoothies have banana as a base as this gives a nice thick milkshake consistency. Bananas are however, very high in fruit sugars. Avocados also give a thick starchy consistency, are rich in vitamins, minerals and healthy fats, without the sugar content. They have a delicate flavour and will mix well with fruits or vegetables. Scoop out and use the cream coloured flesh if you don't want the green colour.

Serve over ice
Recent research has shown an increase in acid erosion at higher temperatures. The lower the temperature of the juice or smoothie the slower acid erosion of the tooth surface takes place. Serving your smoothies cold or with ice will reduce the acid erosion of the tooth enamel.

Add milk
Adding milk to a smoothie will increase the calcium content. Calcium acts as a buffer and reduces the effect of acid on enamel. Added calcium can help offset acid erosion of the enamel surface and can help re harden the enamel after exposure to fruit acids. For those who wish to avoid cows' milk, calcium enriched Soya or oat milks would have the same effect. Nut milks such as almond milk also contain a high concentration of calcium and can be made by blending fresh ground almonds with water. This can then be added to a smoothie as a useful alternative to milk.

By following these simple guidelines you can get the best out of your smoothie maker and improve your overall health and wellbeing without putting your teeth at risk or expanding your waistline!


This article has been brought to you in association with Philips Oral Healthcare. For more information on nutrition and oral health, visit www.perio-nutrition.com.


Juliette Reeves is an expanded duties hygienist and trained nutritionist with almost 30 years experience. She qualified from Birmingham Dental Hospital in 1981 and studied nutrition with Patrick Holford from 1995. Juliette is a Key Opinion Leader for Phillips Oral Healthcare and an ambassador for the Sunstar Oral Health Foundation. She writes regularly for the international dental press, and is an editorial advisor to a number of dental journals including Preventive Dentistry. Juliette is senior UK tutor for the Swiss Dental Academy and clinical director of perio-nutrition. She has written and lectured internationally over the last ten years on the systemic link between nutrition and oral health. As a practicing hygienist, her main areas of interest are nutritional influences in periodontal disease, stress, bone density and female hormones. You can visit her website at www.perio-nutrition.com and email her at info@perio-nutrition.com.

 Posted on : Fri 18th - Jun - 2010

 

Call Dental Support UK

Premium IT Support

  • All Servers & workstations covered..
  • Saturday Cover INCLUDED.
  • Telephone support.
  • Remote support.
  • 4 hour on-site Server response.
  • System monitoring.
  • Network monitoring and security.
  • Anti-Virus & Application updates.
  • Unlimited Remote Server Data backup.
  • Loan equipment on hardware failure.
  • Reduced rates for PC parts supply & installations.

No matter how big
your practice you
pay the same
price!!


ONLY

Click here for more info
Dental News Archives 2018

November - 2018
October - 2018
September - 2018
August - 2018
July - 2018
June - 2018
May - 2018
April - 2018
March - 2018
February - 2018
January - 2018

Dental News Archives 2017

December - 2017
November - 2017
October - 2017
September - 2017
August - 2017
July - 2017
June - 2017
May - 2017
April - 2017
March - 2017
February - 2017
January - 2017

Dental News Archives 2016

December - 2016
November - 2016
October - 2016
September - 2016
August - 2016
July - 2016
June - 2016
May - 2016
April - 2016
March - 2016
February - 2016
January - 2016

Dental News Archives 2015

December - 2015
November - 2015
October - 2015
September - 2015
August - 2015
July - 2015
June - 2015
May - 2015
April - 2015
March - 2015
February - 2015
January - 2015

Dental News Archives 2014

December - 2014
November - 2014
October - 2014
September - 2014
August - 2014
July - 2014
June - 2014
May - 2014
April - 2014
March - 2014
February - 2014
January - 2014

Dental News Archives 2013

December - 2013
November - 2013
October - 2013
September - 2013
August - 2013
July - 2013
June - 2013
May - 2013
April - 2013
March - 2013
February - 2013
January - 2013

Dental News Archives 2012

December - 2012
November - 2012
October - 2012
September - 2012
August - 2012
July - 2012
June - 2012
May - 2012
April - 2012
March - 2012
February - 2012
January - 2012

Dental News Archives 2011

January - 2011
February - 2011
March - 2011
April - 2011
May - 2011
June - 2011
July - 2011
August - 2011
September - 2011
October - 2011
November - 2011
December - 2011

Dental News Archives 2010

December - 2010
November - 2010
October - 2010
September - 2010
August - 2010
July - 2010
June - 2010
May - 2010
April - 2010
March - 2010
February - 2010
January - 2010

Dental News Archives 2009

December - 2009
November - 2009
October - 2009
September - 2009
August - 2009
July - 2009
June - 2009
May - 2009
April - 2009
March - 2009
February - 2009
January - 2009

Dental News Archives 2008

December - 2008
November - 2008
October - 2008
September - 2008
August - 2008
July - 2008
June - 2008
May - 2008
April - 2008
March - 2008
February - 2008
January - 2008

Dental News Archives 2007

December - 2007
November - 2007
October - 2007
September - 2007
August - 2007
July - 2007
June - 2007
May - 2007
April - 2007
March - 2007
February - 2007
January - 2007

Dental News Archives 2006

December - 2006
November - 2006
October - 2006
September - 2006
August - 2006
July - 2006
June - 2006
May - 2006
April - 2006
March - 2006
February - 2006
January - 2006

Dental News Archives 2005

December - 2005
November - 2005
October - 2005
September - 2005
August - 2005
July - 2005
June - 2005
May - 2005

hide toolbar
Would you like weekly updates on our latest offers? If so enter your email :
Quick Remote Dental Support